Monday, March 13, 2017

Faux Marbling on the Gelli® Plate

Happy Monday! 

It’s Birgit here again with a fun new technique, faux marbling on the Gelli® plate! 

This is such a fun technique, once I started I just couldn’t stop because every print I pulled was a surprise, some kind of magic, and I loved them all.


So prepare yourself, when you sit down to try this!

The technique itself is very simple and so are the supplies you need. 
A Gelli® plate and a brayer, of course. And then some acrylic paints, a piece of hemp rope and white card stock or watercolor paper.

 

Take a little piece of hemp rope and pull it apart until you get a bunch of fine threads. 


Start with making some simple background prints in two colors, just to add some color to the paper.

 

For the second layer, roll out a thin layer of two or three colors on plate. Then place the thin threads on top of the paint and one of your Gelli® printed backgrounds on top.




Rub firmly, lift up the paper and remove the loose threads. That’s it!

 

Now, when you leave the left over threads on the plate and apply paint on top for your next print then some of the color of your previous print will also transfer to this print, which makes it even more interesting. You can of course add new threads too. 








Sometimes, when your layer of paint is thin enough and there are not to many threads left on the plate they get totally embedded in the print and you can just leave them on the paper. This is adding awesome texture to your print!








Vary with the amount and thickness of the threads to get different results.

 

Another thing you can try instead adding threads to the plate, is to not clean your brayer and use the threads that stuck to your brayer from a previous print to create very fine texture.  
Also try making prints on white paper to get little white highlights.




The less threads are left on the plate the more subtle the result will be.


You can just carry on printing without adding thread until your plate is clean. Or when the color of the threads is getting really dirty you can just use a baby wipe to clean the plate. 

Here are some more results: 






And last but not least I like to share with you a print made by Jimmy Hadley, who is a printmaking student and made this lovely print at the Gelli® Arts booth at NAMTA. 

As you can see you can also combine this technique with stencils and other printmaking tools!


I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and can’t wait to see your results! Feel free to tag me on Instagram (@birgitkoopsen) so I can see what you made!

Happy printing! 
Birgit




PS: Please—share your prints with us on our Facebook page, or on Instagram using the hashtag #gelliprint #gelliarts and #gelliplate. Tag us with @gelliarts on Instagram and Twitter too! We love to see what you're creating!!

Remember, we now have Gelli® partners all over the world, so it's easier than ever to find a Gelli® retailer near you!



Thursday, March 2, 2017

Mixing Colors on The Gelli® Plate

Hi There! 
Have you ever wondered why some colors work well together on the Gelli® plate and others turn into a mud color when mixed? Or are you looking for a fun way to teach your kids about color theory? 

Today I’m going to show you how you can use the Gelli® plate for color mixing and how you can use your knowledge about paint colors to your advantage!


First things first. I’m sure you are familiar with the color wheel:



There are three primary colors: blue, red and yellow or, if you want to be more scientific: cyan, magenta and yellow.

With these three paint colors you can mix all other colours.

When you mix two of them together in equal amounts you get the secondary colours and tertiary colours when you change the ratio of the two primary colours you put into the mix.

This is what that looks like on Gelli® prints:



Red + Blue (Magenta + Cyan) = Violets and Blues



Red + Yellow (Magenta + Yellow) = Reds and Oranges



Yellow + Blue (Yellow + Cyan) = Greens and Aquas

It’s fun to mix your own paint colors and it’s especially fun to let your kids have a go at it!
So… what about the mud color? 

Mud or neutral colours usually emerge when you try to mix all three primary colours together. In other words: put cyan, yellow, greens and aquas (the cyan/yellow mixes) together on the Gelli® Plate and it will look good. 

But blue and orange (which has yellow and magenta in it) together on the plate will end up a brownish colour, especially when you really mix the colours with a brayer.

When you mix pure cyan, yellow and magenta together though, you’ll get a nice neutral grey. Which can be very useful, but maybe not what you are looking for when you’re trying to make a colourful Gelli® print.


That said, it doesn’t mean that you can never use blue and orange together (or lime and purple, green and magenta etc). As they are opposites, the so-called complementary colours, they look striking when paired!


They just don’t mix very well, so it’s better to use them side by side or in an added printed layer.Now for the magical part!


Once you know about the way colors mix, you can not only use that to your advantage when applying paint on the Gelli® plate, but also when printing in layers. This is especially fun when you use transparent paint colors, like cyan, yellow and magenta.
Happy color mixing!
- Marsha



Materials:

Gelli Arts®: 

Other:
Paper
Acrylic paint (Royal Talens Amsterdam: Primary Cyan, Primary Magenta, Primary Yellow, Titanium White)
Stencil (Nathalie Kalbach for Stencil Girl Products - Manhattan)
Washi tape


PS: Please—share your prints with us on our Facebook page, or on Instagram using the hashtag #gelliprint #gelliarts and #gelliplate. Tag us with @gelliarts on Instagram and Twitter too! We love to see what you're creating!!

Remember, we now have Gelli® partners all over the world, so it's easier than ever to find a Gelli® retailer near you!





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